Traditional Italian Chocolate-Dipped Almond Horns recipe – horseshoe-shaped crescent cookies that are moist and chewy on the inside with a crunchy almond texture on the outside.

Traditional Italian Chocolate-Dipped Almond Horns recipe - horseshoe-shaped crescent cookies that are moist and chewy on the inside with a crunchy almond texture on the outside.Welcome to your new favorite holiday cookie! I know these bad boys are called “horns” but they are obviously shaped more like horseshoes. You can really shape these Italian Chocolate-Dipped Almond Horns any way you like, but I like to stick with tradition. Everyone recognizes these cookies when they are shaped this way, and what can I say, I am a creature of habit.

Grandma's Traditional Italian Chocolate-Dipped Almond Horns recipe - horseshoe-shaped crescent cookies that are moist and chewy on the inside with a crunchy almond texture on the outside.

Everyone counts on me to bring the Italian cookies when I go to holiday parties. Mr. Wishes’ grandmother always made the Italian cookies (she was famous for these Italian Almond Macaroons) for Christmas and I try to keep that tradition going in her memory. They are always the first to disappear at dessert time so I know I’m doing something right.

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If you’re wondering what else I add to my cookie trays as far as Italian desserts go, these Italian Ricotta Cookies and these Easy Christmas Rum Balls are always present. Both cookie recipes are so easy to make. Last year, I also made these Italian Ricotta Peach Cookies for the first time. They turned out just like the cookies we had in Italy when we visited back in the day! The peach cookies were a bit more time consuming as they required more steps, but worth every minute.

Don’t skip dipping these Italian Chocolate-Dipped Almond Horns in the chocolate – it makes a world of difference!

Happy holiday baking!

Easy Traditional Italian Chocolate-Dipped Almond Horns recipe - horseshoe-shaped crescent cookies that are moist and chewy on the inside with a crunchy almond texture on the outside.

Italian Chocolate-Dipped Almond Horns
Author: 
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: Italian
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 12 cookies
 
Easy Traditional Italian Chocolate-Dipped Almond Horns recipe - horseshoe-shaped crescent cookies that are moist and chewy on the inside with a crunchy almond texture on the outside.
Ingredients
  • 10 ounces marzipan, broken into 1-inch pieces
  • 4 ounces finely ground almonds
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg white
  • 1½ teaspoons pure almond extract
  • 1 cup sliced almonds
  • 4 ounces semi-sweet or dark chocolate, finely chopped
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Line your baking sheet with parchment paper or silicone baking mat.
  2. In bowl of stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment (or use a hand mixer), mix marzipan, almonds, and sugar on low speed until combined (mixture may appear dry).
  3. Mix in egg white and almond extract until well combined.
  4. Place sliced almonds in shallow dish and lightly crush with hands.
  5. Divide dough into 12 equal portions (about 1 rounded tablespoon each). Roll each ball into crushed almonds as you shape it into approximately 4½-inch ropes with blunt ends.
  6. Shape rope into U-shape and place on prepared baking sheet. Continue with remaining balls of dough, evenly spacing them apart on baking sheet.
  7. Bake cookies until just beginning to turn golden, about 15 minutes.
  8. Let cool on pan about 10 minutes, then transfer to cooling rack to cool completely.
  9. In microwave or using the double broiler method, melt half of chocolate, then add remaining chocolate and stir to melt.
  10. Immediately dip ends of almond horns in chocolate and place back on parchment paper lined baking sheet.
  11. Chill cookies in fridge until set. Serve cookies at room temperature. Enjoy!

Grandma's Traditional Italian Chocolate-Dipped Almond Horns recipe - horseshoe-shaped crescent cookies that are moist and chewy on the inside with a crunchy almond texture on the outside.Recipe source: adapted from seriouseats.com